Octopus hits the record for guarding its eggs for over 53 months...

Octopus hits the record for guarding its eggs for over 53 months in Monterey Bay

Octopus has a very short life span of three to five years. They are little known for parenting in recent years.

This female octopus was photographed in May 2007 clinging to a rocky wall in Monterey Canyon less than a month after she laid her eggs and began brooding them - and was still there over four years later
This female octopus was photographed in May 2007 clinging to a rocky wall in Monterey Canyon less than a month after she laid her eggs and began brooding them – and was still there over four years later

Researchers at the Monetary Bay Aquarium Research Institue in California have spotted a steadfast little octopus, Graneledone boreopacifica brooding its eggs for 53 months setting an extraordinary record of animal motherhood.

The female octopus clinging to a rocky ledge just above the floor of the canyon, about 1,400 meters (4,600 feet) below the ocean surface.
The female octopus clinging to a rocky ledge just above the floor of the canyon, about 1,400 meters (4,600 feet) below the ocean surface.

Throughout this period, the Octomom kept the eggs clean and fought off the predators- even though she grew weaker.

The deep-sea octopus broods eggs for over four years? - onger than any known animal
The deep-sea octopus broods eggs for over four years? – onger than any known animal

In May 2007, during their research, a team of biologists spotted a female octopus clinging to a rocky ledge about 1,400 metres below the surface of the water in Canyon.

On their second visit, Robinson and his team noticed that the octopus had hatched 160 eggs attached to a rock.

She's gone: The last time the researchers saw the brooding octopus was in September 2011. When they returned one month later, they found that the female was gone. After counting the remnants of the egg capsules, the researchers estimated that the female octopus had been brooding about 160 eggs.
She’s gone: The last time the researchers saw the brooding octopus was in September 2011. When they returned one month later, they found that the female was gone. After counting the remnants of the egg capsules, the researchers estimated that the female octopus had been brooding about 160 eggs.

The team visited the same site for 18 times to record the incredibly slow growth of the babies in 37-degree-Fahrenheit water.

As the years passed, the mother octopus gradually lost weight and her skin became loose and pale. Finally in October 2011, Robinson could never trace the mother, she was gone forever. The eggs were now only empty cases- each one about the size of a shrunken olive.

After counting the egg cases, researchers figured there must have been about 160 babies, all of which had swum off.
Via : dailymail